PRE-OP/POST-OP INSTRUCTIONS

Depending on the procedure you are having done, there are some different pre-op preparations and post-op care that you should heed to ensure the best experience possible. We list all of the points by procedure below.

DEEP CLEANING

A deep cleaning, or scaling, treatment removes hardened plaque, called tartar, from the teeth and the spaces just below the gum line, where it is difficult to brush. This is a more intense cleaning than others, really getting into the pits and crevices of teeth, in between them, and even under the gum line. Anesthesia is used for the procedure, but extra care may be needed afterward to minimize discomfort.

PRE-OPERATION

Before coming in for a scaling, continue practicing normal hygiene procedures.

  1. Brush your teeth at least twice per day.
  2. Use cleaning aids such as mouth wash, floss, and any others that have been recommended by your dentist.
  3. Refrain from smoking, as tobacco has a negative impact on oral health.

POST-OPERATION

After a scaling procedure, your teeth and gums can feel uncomfortable for a few days up to a couple of weeks.

  1. Do not eat anything until the anesthesia has worn off.
  2. When eating, avoid spicy and hard foods.
  3. Use a soft tooth brush at least twice per day, and brush very lightly the first night. Rinsing the brush under hot water before brushing can soften the bristles.
  4. On the second day, continue with flossing and any other cleaning methods, such as mouth rinse (but avoid any that contain alcohol.
  5. If teeth are still sensitive, try using a desensitizing toothpaste.
  6. Mixing a half teaspoon of salt with a cup of water will help heal gums faster. This should be done 2-3 times per day.
  7. Avoid smoking for at least 24 hours after the procedure, as the tobacco slows the rate of healing.
  8. If discomfort persists, you can take up to between 600-800 mg of ibuprofen (Advil) every 4-6 hours as needed, but do not exceed 2400 mg within a 24 hour period, or you can take 1000 mg of Extra Strength Tylenol every 4-6 hours, but do not exceed 4000 mg within 24 hours.

GENERAL CLEANING

A general cleaning helps maintain good oral hygiene by removing plaque buildup from hard to clean places. These cleanings aren’t usually painful, but some discomfort can arise if the teeth and gums haven’t been cared for with proper hygiene.

PRE-OPERATION

Continuing to observe proper hygiene will keep teeth relatively clean and considerably healthy, and a general cleaning will just enforce this overall health by removing any hard to reach plaque buildup.

  1. Brush your teeth at least twice per day, preferably after meals.
  2. Use cleaning aids such as mouth rinse and floss to break down and remove as much plaque as possible. Fluoride toothpastes will help strengthen teeth as well.
  3. Avoid drinking acidic and carbonated beverages, as these wear away the protective layers around teeth. Reduce sugar intake as well to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

POST-OPERATION

While a general cleaning isn’t usually uncomfortable or painful, if the teeth and gums are not properly taken care of, they can become sore or even bleed after a cleaning.

  1. Rinse your mouth with salt water 2 to 3 times per day. Use up to a teaspoon of salt per cup of water for the rinse. This will ease discomfort and help gums heal.
  2. If your teeth or gums are sore, you can use ibuprofen or Tylenol as directed for pain relief.
  3. Children can use Children’s Tylenol, Advil, or Motrin as directed for pain relief.
  4. If pain or bleeding persists beyond 7 days, do not hesitate to contact our offices to address the issue

Reference:

http://www.houstonspediatricdentist.com/postop-care.php?mode=desktop#oral_discomfort

Oral Cancer Screening

Oral cancer is the sixth most common diagnosed form of cancer in the United States, and early detection is the best way to slow its progression. We perform oral cancer screenings with our exams to look for any signs of cancerous growths or abnormal changes in the gums, around the jaw line, and in the neck.

PRE-OPERATION

Oral cancer screenings can be part of your dental exam, and as such, there isn’t much need for special preparation outside of regular hygiene.

  1. Continue brushing, flossing, and rinsing your teeth as normal.
  2. Cutting back on tobacco and/or alcohol use will help reduce the likelihood of developing oral cancer.
  3. Early detection of oral cancer increases the chances of managing it and improving survivability.
  4. Getting regular screenings will improve detection odds.

POST-OPERATION

After your screening is complete, we’ll inform you about the results and recommend some changes that you can make to prevent getting oral cancer or slow its progress.

  1. Stopping smoking will reduce the progression or help prevent the onset of oral cancer.
  2. Reducing alcohol intake will also help slow or prevent oral cancer.
  3. Maintain a healthy, balanced diet, as your diet can have a significant effect on developing cancer. Processed foods have been linked to several cancers that have been diagnosed.
  4. Reduce sun exposure and use SPF rated chap stick for lips to reduce the chances of developing oral cancer from sun exposure.

Reference:

http://www.adc4smiles.com/velscope-enhanced-oral-cancer-screening.html

http://www.warnickandsemder.com/oral-cancer-screening

Sealants

Sealing teeth fills in the fissures and pits found on top of the back teeth. Bacteria likes to cling to these areas and cause tooth decay, but by filling them in, it keeps bacteria from hiding in where it is difficult to thoroughly brush. The sealants are usually made from a composite resin that can last up to a decade, providing long lasting protection from tooth decay.

PRE-OPERATION

Keeping up with good oral hygiene is necessary for sealants to be effective.

  1. Brush your teeth at least twice per day, focusing especially on the pits and fissures of the back teeth.
  2. Use mouth rinse to break down and remove plaque.
  3. Use floss to clean between teeth

POST-OPERATION

Sealants reduce the chances of getting tooth decay, but they do not eliminate it. Proper oral hygiene must be maintained in addition to getting a sealant.

  1. Brush all over, just as you would without the sealant. The sides and backs of sealed teeth are not protected by the sealant, which only coats the top of the tooth.
  2. Avoid eating hard candy or ice, as these can cause a sealant to fracture.
  3. Regular dental appointments will make sure the sealant is remaining in place and protecting your teeth.

Reference:

http://www.houstonspediatricdentist.com/postop-care.php?mode=desktop#sealants

Bondings / Fillings

Bondings and fillings are restorative methods used to preserve teeth that have been damaged by tooth decay. When the crown of a tooth has been badly damaged, it may be filled with an amalgam, resin, or glass ionomer to strengthen it on the inside, but for lighter damage on the surface, bonding can be used to restore the look of natural teeth while strengthening the area affected by decay.

PRE-OPERATION

Bondings and fillings can be a lengthy process and it’s important to be prepared for them.

  1. Eat a snack that has protein and a complex carbohydrate, such as yogurt, peanut butter, or cheese.
  2. Drink plenty of fluids, particularly water.
  3. Take an anti-inflammatory drug (Advil or Aleve) prior to your appointment. The medicine will help with discomfort after the operation is complete.

POST-OPERATION

After your operation, some discomfort is normal. Discomfort should pass within 3-4 days.

  1. Do not chew anything until the anesthetic has worn off and the numbness is gone. While the numbness remains, you could accidentally bite your tongue, cheek, or lips without feeling it, and cause serious damage.
  2. Do not chew food on the side of your mouth that was operated on until the tooth or teeth are covered by a protective coating.
  3. Continue with regular oral hygiene habits like brushing, flossing, and using mouth rinse.
  4. If brushing is uncomfortable, try using a desensitizing toothpaste like Sensodyne to lessen the discomfort.
  5. If you are experiencing discomfort after the procedure, you can take ibuprofen (Advil), aspirin, or acetaminophen (Tylenol) as directed to alleviate the pain. Rinsing your mouth with salt water (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) can also alleviate discomfort.
  6. If your pain worsens or continues beyond 3-4 days, contact us to schedule another appointment.

 

Reference:

http://www.aventuradentalassociates.com/new-patient/pre-op-post-op-instructions/

http://lakedental.com/resources/post-operative-instructions

Permanent Bridges

A permanent bridge binds a false tooth to two adjacent teeth. The adjacent teeth are covered by a cap, and a metal framework links the teeth together, forming a bridge. A permanent bridge will be with you for a long time, especially if it’s taken care of. Placing a permanent bridge usually takes two or three appointments, one to prepare the teeth, one to install the bridge, and a third may be necessary to ensure a proper fit.

PRE-OPERATION

Preparing teeth and installing the permanent bridge can take some time, so it’s good to be prepared for each visit.

  1. Eat a snack that has protein and a complex carbohydrate, such as yogurt, peanut butter, or cheese.
  2. Drink plenty of water.
  3. Take an anti-inflammatory drug (Advil or Aleve) prior to your appointment. The medicine will help with discomfort after the operation is complete.

POST-OPERATION

Some discomfort after installing a permanent bridge is normal. This discomfort should subside within the next few days.

  1. Avoid chewing until the anesthetic has completely worn off to prevent accidentally biting your tongue, lips, or cheeks and causing serious damage.
  2. Keep the bridge clean with regular brushing, flossing, and mouth rinses.
  3. Floss the bridge from the sides to prevent accidentally removing it.
  4. If your permanent bridge comes out, contact us right away so we can temporarily re-cement it for you.
  5. If you experience any pain or discomfort after your procedure, you can use pain medications like ibuprofen, aspirin, and acetaminophen as directed to manage pain. A salt rinse (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) can also help alleviate discomfort.
  6. If you have a persistent or increasing pain after your procedure, contact us to schedule an appointment.

 

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/post-op-instructions/

http://lakedental.com/resources/post-operative-instructions

Temporary Bridges

Temporary bridges are used after preparing your teeth for a permanent bridge. The temporary bridge is installed right after tooth preparation and remains in place until the permanent one is installed. This temporary bridge protects your teeth from damage and reduces uncomfortable sensitivity.

PRE-OPERATION

Preparing teeth involves filing them down so caps can be placed on teeth adjacent to a gap. This process can take some time, so it’s good to be prepared for each visit.

  1. Eat a snack that has protein and a complex carbohydrate, such as yogurt, peanut butter, or cheese.
  2. Drink plenty of water.
  3. Take an anti-inflammatory drug (Advil or Aleve) prior to your appointment. The medicine will help with discomfort after the operation is complete.

POST-OPERATION

Your temporary bridge will only be needed until your next appointment when the permanent bridge is installed. During this time, it’s important to keep it clean and avoid dislodging it.

  1. Avoid chewing until the anesthetic has completely worn off to prevent accidentally biting your tongue, lips, or cheeks and causing serious damage.
  2. Avoid eating any sticky foods, particularly gum, as well as hard foods until the permanent bridge is installed.
  3. Keep the bridge clean with regular brushing, flossing, and mouth rinses.
  4. Floss the bridge from the sides to prevent accidentally removing it.
  5. If your temporary bridge comes out, contact us right away so we can re-cement it for you.
  6. If you experience any pain or discomfort after your procedure, you can use pain medications like ibuprofen, aspirin, and acetaminophen as directed to manage pain. A salt rinse (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) can also help alleviate discomfort.
  7. If you have a persistent or increasing pain after your procedure, contact us to schedule an appointment.

 

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/post-op-instructions/

http://lakedental.com/resources/post-operative-instructions

Permanent Crowns

Permanent crowns are placed over the core of a tooth to protect it and retain as much of the original tooth as possible while reinforcing it and maintaining full functionality of the teeth. Permanent crowns can take two or three visits to complete.

PRE-OPERATION

Preparing teeth for crowns involves filing them down so the crowns can be placed on top of a tooth’s core. When fitting the permanent crown, ensuring a proper fit is essential to comfort and crown integrity. Future visits after the permanent crown setting may be necessary to achieve the proper fit. These processes can take some time, so it’s good to be prepared for each visit.

  1. Eat a snack that has protein and a complex carbohydrate, such as yogurt, peanut butter, or cheese.
  2. Drink plenty of water.

Take an anti-inflammatory drug (Advil or Aleve) prior to your appointment. The medicine will help with discomfort after the operation is complete.

POST-OPERATION

It is very common to feel discomfort such as pressure, heat, or cold sensitivity after the operation, and your gums can be sore for a few days. This discomfort should subside on its own, but other measures can be taken to alleviate pain.

  1. Avoid chewing until the anesthetic has completely worn off to prevent accidentally biting your tongue, lips, or cheeks and causing serious damage.
  2. Keep the crown clean with regular brushing, flossing, and mouth rinses.
  3. If your permanent crown comes out, contact us right away so we can temporarily re-cement it for you.
  4. If you experience any pain or discomfort after your procedure, you can use pain medications like ibuprofen, aspirin, and acetaminophen as directed to manage pain. A salt rinse (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) can also help alleviate discomfort.
  5. If you have a persistent or increasing pain after your procedure, contact us to schedule an appointment.

 

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/post-op-instructions/

Temporary Crowns

After your first appointment in the process of getting a permanent crown, you will need a temporary crown to protect your tooth while the permanent crown is prepared. This temporary crown fits over the tooth just like the permanent one will, but it will be removed during your next appointment.

PRE-OPERATION

Preparing teeth for crowns involves filing them down so the crowns can be placed on top of a tooth’s core. This process can take some time, so it’s good to be prepared for the visit.

  1. Eat a snack that has protein and a complex carbohydrate, such as yogurt, peanut butter, or cheese.
  2. Drink plenty of water.
  3. Take an anti-inflammatory drug (Advil or Aleve) prior to your appointment. The medicine will help with discomfort after the operation is complete.

POST-OPERATION

It is very common to feel discomfort such as pressure, heat, or cold sensitivity after the operation, and your gums can be sore for a few days. This discomfort should subside on its own, but other measures can be taken to alleviate pain.

  1. Avoid chewing until the anesthetic has completely worn off to prevent accidentally biting your tongue, lips, or cheeks and causing serious damage.
  2. Avoid eating any sticky foods, especially gum, as well as hard foods until the permanent crown is installed.
  3. Keep the crown clean with regular brushing, flossing, and mouth rinses.
  4. Floss the crown from the sides to prevent accidentally removing it.
  5. If your temporary crown comes out, contact us right away so we can re-cement it for you. Be sure to keep the temporary if it does fall out.
  6. If you experience any pain or discomfort after your procedure, you can use pain medications like ibuprofen, aspirin, and acetaminophen as directed to manage pain. A salt rinse (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) can also help alleviate discomfort.
  7. If you have a persistent or increasing pain after your procedure, contact us to schedule an appointment.

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/post-op-instructions/

Dentures

Dentures, whether partial or complete, serve as a replacement for several lost teeth. These replacements still need to be cared for just like regular teeth, as they can get plaque and tartar buildup, which can lead to bad breath and stains. Denture brushes are meant specifically for dentures, and denture cleansers should be used daily.

PRE-OPERATION

Keeping your mouth clean is an important aspect of everyday life, and it is equally important just before getting new dentures. Clean all of the teeth, especially those adjacent to gaps where partial dentures will be fitted. The process for preparing your mouth for dentures, if the teeth are not already gone, can be lengthy, and it is best to be prepared.

  1. Eat a snack that has protein and a complex carbohydrate, such as yogurt, peanut butter, or cheese.
  2. Drink plenty of water.
  3. Take an anti-inflammatory drug (Advil or Aleve) prior to your appointment. The medicine will help with discomfort after the operation is complete.

POST-OPERATION

Your new dentures will function just like your regular teeth, but they do require some special care.

  1. Use a soft bristled toothbrush to clean any remaining teeth.
  2. Brush your tongue, palate, and gums as well to freshen breath and stimulates circulation in your gums, which keeps them healthy.
  3. Soak dentures in a denture cleanser daily to keep them fresh and clean.
  4. If stains develop on your dentures, soak them in white vinegar for several hours. If the dentures do not contain any metal, you can soak them in a diluted bleach solution for tougher stains.
  5. Do not soak dentures with metal with a cleaning agent for more than 15 minutes.
  6. Rinse your dentures thoroughly after every cleaning.
  7. Keep dentures in water or cleaning solution any time they are out of your mouth.
  8. When going to bed, take your dentures out to give your gums a chance to rest and recuperate.
  9. If you have any discomfort or notice that the fit isn’t snug, contact us for an examination to correct any issues.

Reference:

http://lakedental.com/resources/post-operative-instructions

Root Canal Therapy

Root canal therapy helps to restore teeth that have been damaged from lack of care, infection, and trauma. When damaged, the pulp chamber in the tooth needs to be cleared out, including down to the roots of the affected tooth. Once cleared out, the tooth is filled with resin or an amalgam to strengthen and protect it.

PRE-OPERATION

Root canal therapy is a relatively simple procedure when it comes to preparation. The process can be a bit lengthy, however, and it is best to be prepared for this.

  1. If you have Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP), heart murmur, any prosthesis, or if you have rheumatic heart disease, and have been prescribed an antibiotic premedication for any of these conditions, make sure you have taken the correct prescribed antibiotic the day of your root canal.
  2. In order to reduce inflammation and discomfort post-operation, you may take ibuprofen (Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or naproxen sodium (Aleve) 2-4 hours before your operation.
  3. Eat a snack with protein and a complex carbohydrate to help get you through the long procedure.
  4. Drink plenty of water.

POST-OPERATION

Once your operation is complete, the inside of your tooth is sealed, but the outer part of the operation site only has a temporary seal. A permanent seal will be placed during a follow up appointment. It is important that you protect this temporary seal until the permanent one is set.

  1. Wait at least 30 minutes after your operation before chewing anything. This gives the anesthetic time to wear off so you don’t accidentally bite your lips or tongue.
  2. The tooth operated on and the surrounding gums may be tender or sensitive to pressure, cold, and heat after your operation. This is normal and will subside over time.
  3. You can take anti-inflammatory medications as directed or use a salt rinse (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) to help reduce discomfort.
  4. If you were prescribed antibiotics either before or after the procedure, continue to take them as directed for as long as the medication indicates.
  5. If your bite feels uneven, you notice increased swelling, or the pain is unmanageable, contact our office to schedule another appointment.

Reference:

http://www.aventuradentalassociates.com/new-patient/pre-op-post-op-instructions/

http://lakedental.com/resources/post-operative-instructions

Root Canal Retreatment

Most times, a single root canal is all that is needed to treat a tooth that is damaged on the inside, but in some uncommon cases, the tooth may not heal properly after a procedure, or a small root may have been missed and become infected. If this happens, you may need a root canal retreatment. The preparation and post-op conditions are largely the same as getting your first treatment.

PRE-OPERATION

If the tooth didn’t heal properly after getting a root canal, you may notice that the pain was uncontrollable or more swelling was present. In these cases, you would contact us and have the tooth retreated to ensure the whole tooth is properly treated.

  1. If you have Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP), heart murmur, any prosthesis, or if you have rheumatic heart disease, and have been prescribed an antibiotic premedication for any of these conditions, make sure you have taken the correct prescribed antibiotic the day of your root canal retreatment.
  2. In order to reduce inflammation and discomfort post-operation, you may take ibuprofen (Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or naproxen sodium (Aleve) 2-4 hours before your operation.
  3. Eat a snack with protein and a complex carbohydrate to help get you through the long procedure.
  4. Drink plenty of water.

POST-OPERATION

Just as with the first root canal treatment, you will receive a temporary seal on the outer portion of the tooth which must be protected until a permanent one can be installed.

  1. Wait at least 30 minutes after your operation before chewing anything. This gives the anesthetic time to wear off so you don’t accidentally bite your lips or tongue.
  2. The tooth operated on and the surrounding gums may be tender or sensitive to pressure, cold, and heat after your operation. This is normal and will subside over time.
  3. You can take anti-inflammatory medications as directed or use a salt rinse (1 tsp salt to 8 oz water) to help reduce discomfort.
  4. If you were prescribed antibiotics either before or after the procedure, continue to take them as directed for as long as the medication indicates.
  5. If your bite feels uneven, you notice increased swelling, or the pain is still unmanageable, contact our office to schedule another appointment. If another retreatment is not an option, an extraction may be necessary.

Reference:
http://www.aae.org/patients/treatments-and-procedures/endodontic-retreatment.aspx

General Extraction

If teeth are too badly damaged to save, or if they have become severely infected, an extract may be necessary to prevent any issues from spreading to other teeth or bone. Simply put, an extraction removes a tooth entirely from your mouth. A space maintainer may be used to keep other teeth from closing in, especially for extractions in children where the adult tooth has not come in yet.

PRE-OPERATION

Extractions are fairly involved procedures and require some extra care before and after your procedure.

  1. Refrain from eating or drinking anything including water for 8 hours prior to your procedure.
  2. Brush and floss all of your teeth prior to your appointment.
  3. You must be accompanied by a responsible adult who is able to drive. This person must come with you to the appointment, remain in the office building during your procedure, and drive you home after your procedure.
  4. Wear low heeled shoes and loose fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbows.
  5. Remove contact lenses, jewelry, and dentures just before your procedure.

POST-OPERATION

After your procedure is completed and the tooth or teeth have been removed, there may be some discomfort for a few days. This is normal and will subside over time.

  1. Do not chew anything for at least 30 minutes after your procedure. The anesthetic needs to wear off so you don’t accidentally bit your tongue or lips.
  2. After the anesthetic has worn off, keep to a soft food diet for one or two days after the procedure. Soft foods include soup (lukewarm), pasta, scrambled eggs, bananas, and mashed potatoes.
  3. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery for 24 hours after your procedure.
  4. Swelling after an extraction is normal, and peaks within 2 to 3 days.
  5. Avoid sucking liquids through a straw or on hard candies for a few days. These actions can generate negative pressure in your mouth, and cause pain or damage the gums around an extraction site.
  6. Some bleeding is normal, but if it persists, gently bite down on a strip of gauze over the extraction site for 15-60 minutes as needed. Afterward, gently bite down on a clean piece of gauze to see if bleeding has stopped. Repeat as necessary.
  7. Don’t rinse your mouth or floss near the extraction site until it has healed.
  8. Avoid smoking, as this can delay healing time.
  9. Avoid hot, carbonated, and alcoholic drinks, as well as hot or spicy foods.
  10. Resume normal oral hygiene habits 24 hours after your procedure, but be gentle around extraction sites for up to a week.
  11. Rinse the extraction site after meals after the first day post-procedure.
  12. Continue taking antibiotics as prescribed, if any.

Reference:

http://www.houstonspediatricdentist.com/postop-care.php?mode=desktop#extractions

http://lakedental.com/resources/post-operative-instructions

Wisdom Teeth Removal

Wisdom teeth come in later in life (when you are wiser), and sometimes never fully penetrate the gums. If this happens, or if they have been impacted into the gums due to trauma, they may need to be removed surgically.

PRE-OPERATION

Preparation for a wisdom tooth extraction is pretty much the same as for any other extraction. Remember that the procedure could take some time, and that a responsible adult should accompany you to the office.

  1. Refrain from eating or drinking anything including water for 8 hours prior to your procedure.
  2. Brush and floss all of your teeth prior to your appointment.
  3. You must be accompanied by a responsible adult who is able to drive. This person must come with you to the appointment, remain in the office building during your procedure, and drive you home after your procedure.
  4. Wear low heeled shoes and loose fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbows.
  5. Remove contact lenses, jewelry, and dentures just before your procedure.

POST-OPERATION

Wisdom teeth removal and surgical extraction of teeth is more involved than a typical extraction, and as such, more care is needed and other effects may occur.

  1. Do not chew anything for at least 30 minutes after your procedure. The anesthetic needs to wear off so you don’t accidentally bit your tongue or lips.
  2. After the anesthetic has worn off, keep to a soft food diet for one or two days after the procedure. Soft foods include soup (lukewarm), pasta, scrambled eggs, bananas, and mashed potatoes.
  3. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery for 24 hours after your procedure.
  4. Swelling after an extraction is normal, and peaks within 2 to 3 days.
  5. Avoid sucking liquids through a straw or on hard candies for a few days. These actions can generate negative pressure in your mouth, and cause pain or damage the gums around an extraction site.
  6. Some bleeding is normal, but if it persists, gently bite down on a strip of gauze over the extraction site for 15-60 minutes as needed. Afterward, gently bite down on a clean piece of gauze to see if bleeding has stopped. Repeat as necessary.
  7. The muscles of your jaw may feel stiff for a few days, you may develop an earache, or you might get a sore throat.
  8. Other teeth around the extraction site may ache occasionally. This is a temporary issue caused by the proximity of nerves within the gums.
  9. Don’t rinse your mouth or floss near the extraction site until it has healed.
  10. Avoid smoking, as this can delay healing time.
  11. Avoid hot, carbonated, and alcoholic drinks, as well as hot or spicy foods.
  12. Resume normal oral hygiene habits 24 hours after your procedure, but be gentle around extraction sites for up to a week.
  13. Rinse the extraction site with warm salt water after meals after the first day post-procedure.
  14. You may have an elevated body temperature for a day or two. This should return to normal after that, but if it does not, please contact our office.
  15. Continue taking antibiotics as prescribed, if any.
  16. Bruises may develop around extraction sites. These are normal and will clear up over time.

Reference:

http://www.houstonspediatricdentist.com/postop-care.php?mode=desktop#extractions

Local Anesthetic

Local anesthetics only numb the area around where we’ll be working in your mouth. This could be a single tooth, a tooth and surrounding gums, or a small section of your mouth or jaw.

PRE-OPERATION

There aren’t any special precautions to be taken before receiving a local anesthetic aside from normal hygiene procedures. Clean all of your teeth with a toothbrush, floss, and mouth rinse prior to any dental appointment.

POST-OPERATION

Numbness is the most prominent side effect of local anesthetics, so it’s important not to accidentally damage your mouth when you can’t feel it.

  1. All of the teeth and surrounding tissue of an operation site will be numb or asleep. The feeling will return to these areas after about 30 minutes.
  2. Do not chew anything while still under the effects of local anesthesia. Since you can’t feel the whole area inside your mouth, it is possible to accidentally bite your tongue or lips
  3. Maintain a liquid or soft food diet until the effects wear off. Most of the effects will wear off within 30 minutes, though it could take a bit longer.

Reference:

http://www.houstonspediatricdentist.com/postop-care.php?mode=desktop#local_anesthetic

Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas)

Nitrous oxide helps relax patients that are a bit anxious about a procedure. This gas is perfectly safe, though patients will feel “out of sorts” while under its effects. The effects do not last long after the mask is removed, however.

PRE-OPERATION

Preparation for using laughing gas is easy, but you will need to start at least three hours prior to your appointment.

  1. Don’t drink or eat anything at least 3 hours before your appointment. Doing so could cause nausea when the gas is inhaled.
  2. A responsible adult over the age of 18 with the capability to drive should accompany you for any procedure that involves sedation, whether laughing gas, oral sedation, or general anesthetic.
  3. A legal parent or guardian must accompany minors for any procedure.

POST-OPERATION

After the procedure is completed, the gas will be turned off and you should regain full functionality and alertness within 3 hours.

  1. Don’t chew anything for up to 3 hours. You may not have full sensation in your mouth for a while, and chewing can lead to accidentally biting a lip or your tongue.
  2. Don’t take any over-the-counter or prescription medications for 3 hours after the appointment.
  3. The responsible adult that came with you to the appointment needs to drive you home and remain with you until you regain full functionality and alertness.
  4. Don’t operate any vehicles or machinery until you are fully alert.
  5. Avoid using any alcohol for at least a day.

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/pre-op-instructions/

Oral Sedation

Oral sedation is stronger than laughing gas, but it doesn’t make you fall asleep usually. You might feel a bit sleepy while under its effects, but a gentle motion will be enough to awaken you. As it is stronger, the guidelines for oral sedation are a bit stricter when it comes to preparation and post-op care.

PRE-OPERATION

Before your operation, be sure to have someone come with you to the office.

  1. Arrive early for your appointment with a responsible adult who is over 18 and can drive you home.
  2. Do not eat or drink anything for 3 hours prior to your appointment. Doing so can induce nausea while sedated.
  3. A parent legal guardian must accompany a minor for any procedure.

POST-OPERATION

The effects of oral sedation can last for up to 4 hours, and will make even simple tasks more difficult.

  1. Don’t chew anything for at least 3 hours after your appointment. Doing so could result in accidentally biting your lips or tongue and causing serious damage.
  2. The responsible adult who accompanies you must drive you home after your procedure and supervise you for at least 4 hours.
  3. Do not drive or operate any machinery for the rest of the day.
  4. Avoid doing anything strenuous for the remainder of the day. This includes going out anywhere or performing activities other than resting.
  5. You must stay awake for at least 3 hours after your procedure. Keep your chin elevated during this time.
  6. Refrain from taking any over the counter or prescription medications for at least 3 hours after your procedure.
  7. Do not drink any alcohol for at least a day.

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/pre-op-instructions/

IV

IV sedation is easily controlled and quickly affects the patient, giving doctors a precise control over how much sedation is used. These sedatives can bring you close to falling asleep or put you under entirely, but this can vary by procedure and patient.

PRE-OPERATION

Before your operation, be sure to have someone come with you to the office.

  1. Arrive early for your appointment with a responsible adult who is over 18 and can drive you home.
  2. Do not eat or drink anything for 3 hours prior to your appointment. Doing so can induce nausea while sedated.
  3. A parent legal guardian must accompany a minor for any procedure.

POST-OPERATION

The effects of IV sedation can last for up to 4 hours, and will make even simple tasks more difficult.

  1. Don’t chew anything for at least 3 hours after your appointment. Doing so could result in accidentally biting your lips or tongue and causing serious damage.
  2. The responsible adult who accompanies you must drive you home after your procedure and supervise you for at least 4 hours.
  3. Do not drive or operate any machinery for the rest of the day.
  4. Avoid doing anything strenuous for the remainder of the day. This includes going out anywhere or performing activities other than resting.
  5. You must stay awake for at least 3 hours after your procedure. Keep your chin elevated during this time.
  6. Refrain from taking any over the counter or prescription medications for at least 3 hours after your procedure.
  7. Do not drink any alcohol for at least a day.

Reference:

https://www.familytreedentalgroup.com/patient-info/pre-op-instructions/

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